Weed, Water & Wood

Directed by: Multiple

Documentary

Total Runtime: 67 min

Country of Origin: USA

Matheson
Saturday June - 2 - 3:00 pm

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$11

Door-Price:

$12

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Three films look at environmental, economic and climate issues that impact Mendocino locally, nationally and globally.

 

THE END OF WEED

Director: Kristy Guevara-Flanagan and Joshua Gray

Distinctions: California Premiere

Country of Origin: USA

“This beautiful, meditative year-in-the-life portrait of a remote weed grower captures the pastoral spirit of a passing era between the time when marijuana cultivation was an underground, artisanal vocation, and what looms ahead with the legalization of recreational pot. Something will be lost when slow weed gets pushed out by big cannibusiness, and Kristy Guevara-Flanagan lets us sit with this for a spell.” — Jon Christensen, UCLA Institute of the
Environment and Sustainability

January 1st marked the beginning of a new era of cannabis legalization in California. While much reporting about the political and social implications of this shift has been done, little attention has been given to the people and communities who created the existing weed landscape and how they will be affected. The enormous shift of power and economics of full legalization will bring impacts far beyond cannabis itself. It remains to be seen how such rural economies will be transformed by the “gold rush fever” grabbing of land, seed patents, and water rights. 15 min.

WATER WARRIORS

Director: Michael Premo

Distinctions: Official Selection, Tribeca Film Festival; Jury Selection for Best Documentary Short Film, One Nation Film Festival; Best Documentary, Austin Under-the-Stars

Country of Origin: USA

“The fight to stop fracking is a story of resistance powered by love—for the water, for our communities and generations to come, for the better world that we’re working so hard to build. In just 22 short, thundering minutes, Water Warriors will leave you immersed in that story, seeing anew all that surrounds you.” — Naomi Klein,  Author of No is Not Enough and This Changes Everything

Water Warriors is the story of a community’s successful resistance against the oil and gas industry.  In 2013, Texas-based SWN Resources arrived in New Brunswick, Canada to explore for natural gas. The region is known for its forestry, farming and fishing industries, which are both commercial and small-scale subsistence operations that rural communities depend on. In response, a multicultural group of unlikely warriors–including members of the Mi’kmaq Elsipogtog First Nation, French-speaking Acadians and white, English-speaking families–set up a series of road blockades, preventing exploration. After months of resistance, their efforts not only halted drilling; they elected a new government and won an indefinite moratorium on fracking in the province. 22 min.

 

BURNED: ARE TREES THE NEW COAL?

Director: Alan Dater and Lisa Merton

Distinctions: Official Selection Utopia Film Festival 2017, Official Selection Wild and Scenic Film Festival 2018

Country of Origin: USA

“It seems to me like climate change is a kind of final exam for our species. We will find out if our big brain was in fact a good idea or not. Maybe if it is connected to a big enough heart to make a difference. We have been given ample warning by the world’s scientists. It is now a matter of whether we’ll heed it or not.”

— Bill McKibben, Author, Educator, Environmentalist

 

‘Burned’ tells the little known story of the accelerating destruction of our forests for fuel, and probes the policy loopholes, huge subsidies, and blatant green washing of the burgeoning biomass power industry. The film follows a dedicated group of forest activists, ecologists, carbon scientists, and concerned citizens who are fighting to establish the enormous value of our forests, protect their communities, debunk this false solution to climate change, and alter energy policy both in the US and abroad. 30 min

Listen as Joy LaClaire of Forthright Radio interviews the filmmakers for the Film Burned: Are Trees the New Coal?

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