Children’s Program: Short Films, Big Adventures

Directed by: multiple filmmakers

Short Film

Total Runtime: 57 min

Country of Origin: United States

Matheson
Saturday June - 3 - 10:00 AM

Advance-Price

$5 children under 12 - $10 adult

Door-Price:

$5 children under 12 - $10 adult

Purchase Tickets

Special Event

Saturday, June 3, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm, Matheson Performing Arts Center, Mendocino

Featuring the best short films from the New York International Children’s Film Festival, these whimsical stories will delight children of all ages. As part of our Children’s Program, the Mendocino Film Festival is giving away a brand-new bicycle to one lucky young artist in our art raffle, sponsored by Sean Leland State Farm! Download your entry form Childrens-Program-Win- A-Brand-New-Bike or visit Sean Leland State Farm at 720 S Main Street
Fort Bragg or the Mendocino Film Festival Box Office to pick up an entry form for your little animator to color.

Recommended ages 3 to 7

Featuring the best short films from the New York International Children’s Film Festival, these whimsical stories will delight children of all ages.

Baking a cake should be easier with eight arms — but that’s only if the arms agree on what cake to make (Octopus).


In One, Two, Three, a tree borrows a pair of boots and goes for a walk.


Jane Goodall’s sense of adventure all started with a toy chimpanzee (Me…Jane).


Tiny Tunes: Food presents a pocket-sized poem about our favorite subject.


A grey lynx doesn’t fit into a colorful world in Looks.


Opinionated six-year-old Fidel doesn’t understand the changes happening in his family in Memories of the Sea.


A bored little girl at the zoo notices a big gorilla… and he notices her (Zoo Story).


A hungry fox and a plump goose cross paths in That is Not a Good Idea.


A clean, organized, well-mannered guest visits in Perfect Houseguest.


Even An Object at Rest encounters lots of obstacles over the course of a millennium.


A man’s home is his castle… But not for long in The Visitors.


A curious girl causes problems when she wants to add some color into her predictable, organized world in The Girl Who Spoke Cat.

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